COVID-19 Communication

St. Louis County Department of Public Health COVID-19 Update


July 6, 2022

St. Louis County COVID-19 Update

 COVID-19 Testing and Determining Close Contacts

The St. Louis County Department of Public Health continues to offer COVID-19 tests at all three St. Louis County Public Health Clinic locations at no cost. Testing remains one of our most important tools in fighting COVID-19. Testing is an important prevention measure to protect yourself, your family and the community at large. 

Regardless of vaccination status, if you’re experiencing COVID-19 symptoms or have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, you should get tested. It is recommended to get tested 5 days after close contact with someone with COVID-19. The CDC considers a close contact as someone who was less than 6 feet away from an infected person (laboratory-confirmed or a clinical diagnosis) for a cumulative total of 15 minutes or more over a 24-hour period. This is regardless of whether the person was wearing a mask properly.

Free drive-through COVID testing is available weekdays with or without appointments, at our three DPH health clinics located in Berkeley, Pine Lawn and Sunset Hills. You can also pick up at-home test kits at our clinics and select library locations throughout the county. These tests can be taken as needed. You provide a saliva sample and then return the test to a Department of Public Health drop-off box. To schedule a COVID-19 testing appointment or for general testing information, please visit DPH’s COVID-19 testing page.


St. Louis County COVID-19 Update

 COVID-19 Cases

 Increase in COVID-19 cases continues in St. Louis County

June 1, 2022

DPH continues to document a steady rise in COVID-19 cases in our community. The rolling seven-day average is currently  366 new cases per day, which represents an 9.8% increase  over a seven-day period. The positivity rate is now 18.5 percent and the public COVID-19 dashboard is up to date.

Given this recent trend as well as the progress of new sub-variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 across the country, DPH continues to strongly recommend that residents use the tools available to slow the spread of the disease: get up to date on vaccines, including boosters; wear masks in public indoor places; and isolate and get tested if you experience any symptoms of COVID-19. If you feel sick, please stay home and get tested. If you use an at-home test, you can report a positive result online here.


St. Louis County COVID-19 Update

 

COVID-19 Cases

 

Increase in COVID-19 cases continues in St. Louis County

May 11, 2022

DPH continues to document a steady rise in COVID-19 cases in our community. The rolling seven-day average is currently 247 new cases per day, which represents a 27.6% increase over a seven-day period. The positivity rate is now 12.9 percent and the public COVID-19 dashboard is up to date.

 

Given this recent trend as well as the progress of new sub-variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 across the country, DPH continues to strongly recommend that residents use the tools available to slow the spread of the disease: get up to date on vaccines, including boosters; wear masks in public indoor places; and isolate and get tested if you experience any symptoms of COVID-19. If you feel sick, please stay home and get tested. If you use an at-home test, you can report a positive result online here.  

 

April Report on Long-Term Care Facilities Shows Ongoing Risk

 

COVID-19 continues to pose a threat to St. Louis County residents who live in nursing homes and other long-term care facilities (LTCFs), newly reported data from April 2022 shows. In facilities across the county, 94 new cases of the disease were reported last month. This is a slight increase from the 76 cases reported in March.

 

Six people died from COVID-19 in St. Louis County LTCFs during this time. This represents a considerable decline from the high death tolls reported over the winter, but people living in care facilities are still at disproportionate risk. In total, 1,384 LTCF residents have died over the course of the pandemic, representing nearly 40% of all COVID-19 deaths in the county.

 

The Department of Public Health is closely monitoring the continued spread of COVID-19 among high-risk populations. For a full report, visit https://stlouiscountymo.gov/st-louis-county-departments/public-health/covid-19/covid-19-data-reports/covid-19-ltc-report/.


Living with COVID-19

April 12, 2022

As we observe the recent decline in new cases of COVID-19, we must also use lessons learned during the pandemic. COVID-19 remains in our community, and we cannot pretend we live in a world in which it doesn’t exist. Our ability to live with COVID-19 largely depends on how well we control its spread.

To that end, the St. Louis County Department of Public Health and the City of St. Louis Department of Health are releasing the attached “Living with COVID” document. It shares actions that individuals and institutions like businesses and schools can take to foster safer and healthier environments moving forward.  We hope that this document helps the public understand that while COVID will likely remain a part of our lives for years to come, we have the tools necessary to control the disease and keep our communities safe – if we choose to use them.

“Similar to other communicable diseases, COVID-19 may likely remain in our community, much like the flu, and we must recognize the impact COVID-19 has had on our communities over the past two years,” says Dr. Mati Hlatshwayo Davis, Director of Health for the City of St. Louis. “Through this coordinated policy with Saint Louis County DPH, we can work in tandem to protect our residents and visitors in the weeks and months to come.”

Dr. Faisal Khan, acting director of the St. Louis County Department of Public Health, agreed.

“Three factors will determine the future course of the pandemic: the virus, its variants and human behavior. Out of the three we can only hope to influence and modify human behavior,” he said. “As we learn to live with the virus, we will need to practice assessing risk. The pandemic is not over, and we may yet be hit again with another surge. However, if we work together to protect ourselves and each other, we will be able to live our lives to the fullest. Please get vaccinated, wash your hands frequently and thoroughly, wear a mask in indoor public spaces and encourage others to do the same. Together we can beat this.”

The two health departments pledge to keep the public informed about the level of COVID-19 in our communities and how best to prevent, treat and recover from the disease. Their teams will continue educating county and city residents about the realities of living with this disease.  Experts in both departments are available to speak with the media about the document and its practical applications for the public.

St. Louis County Full Statement

Q&A 

As a parent, when should I keep my child home from school?  We understand that there are a lot of factors you consider when determining whether you or your child should stay home, and that keeping a child home from school is difficult to coordinate. Isolation and quarantine are key tools to reduce the spread of COVID-19 among children and in the community. We need the cooperation of parents to help create the safest environment for children to learn and play. Please keep your kids home if they are sick or if they are exposed to COVID-19 and are not up to date on their vaccines. In addition, please follow your school’s guidance if your child is excluded from school. For questions about your school’s policy, you’ll need to get in touch with your school directly. For the latest public health guidance, please go to http://www.stlcorona.com or http://www.CDC.gov.  

Do you (DPH) still have authority to isolate and quarantine?  Yes, DPH has the authority to do isolation and quarantine. We work with schools and partners to explain isolation and quarantine. If you have any specific questions, please email us at comments.dph@stlouiscountymo.gov

Do people still have to quarantine even if the health department doesn’t call them and tell them to?  Yes! It is everyone’s responsibility to follow CDC and DHSS guidelines when they apply to them, meaning: If you believe you have COVID, you should follow the guidelines for isolation. If you find out you’ve been around someone with COVID, you should follow the guidelines for quarantine.  

What should people do if they can’t get a test and they have symptoms?  Finding a test may be difficult during this current surge in cases. If you have symptoms consistent with COVID-19 (especially if you have a known exposure, but even if you don’t) and you can’t get a test, you should consider yourself a case. This means you should notify those with whom you had close contact, which is defined as being within 6 feet of someone for 15 minutes or more. For testing options, visit ReviveSTL.com.

If I am concerned that I have coronavirus or may have been exposed, what do I do?
Contact the St. Louis County COVID-19 Hotline 24/7 at (314) 615-2660

Where can I get information and updates?
Visit St. Louis County’s dedicated COVID-19 webpage at www.STLcorona.com
Please follow St. Louis County, the County Department of Public Health and the County Executive on social media for updates.

http://twitter.com/StLCountyDOH
https://www.facebook.com/StLCountyDOH
https://www.facebook.com/CountyExecutiveSamPage/
https://twitter.com/drsampage

University City's City Hall follows St. Louis County's Guidance, which can be found here:  https://stlouiscountymo.gov/st-louis-county-departments/public-health/covid-19/

Where can I get updates about travel?
Coronavirus Disease Information for Travel can be found at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/travelers/index.html

What resources are available from St. Louis County? 
  • Guidance for the general public, churches, schools, businesses, and community organizations on how to prevent the spread of germs and diseases.
  • Regular updates on COVID-19 from the state and federal government.
  • Health education and promotional materials to help promote hand washing, Cover Your Cough, and other community messages.
  • Assistance with emergency planning and preparation.
  • Literature and information for vulnerable populations.
  • St. Louis County clinics can provide medical care to all County residents, regardless of ability to pay.
  • Call (314) 615-0500 if you do not have a doctor.
Additional resources on cleaning your home:  https://www.safehome.org/resources/keeping-house-clean-flu-coronavirus/

Business Assistance Information

The COVID-19 Resources for Business provides up-to-date information on support, loans, and grants for restaurants and other businesses.